Third Grade Objectives

What do third graders need to learn this year?  Here’s what the state of Texas says:

 

§110.14. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 3, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Grade 3
§110.14. English Language Arts and Reading
§111.15. Mathematics
§112.14. Science
§113.14. Social Studies
§114.2. Languages Other Than English
§115.5. Health Education
§116.5. Physical Education
§117.11. Art
§117.12. Music
§117.13. Theatre
§126.3. Technology Applications
 
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative–students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In third grade, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis.
(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students’ native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.
(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL’s ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.
(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the
context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.
(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners’ abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.
(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, §4.002, which states, “The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language,” students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations at Grade 3 as described in subsection (b) of this section.
(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, §28.002(h), which states, “… each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks,” students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:
(A)  decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including:
(i)  dropping the final “e” and add endings such as -ing, -ed, or -able (e.g., use, using, used, usable);
(ii)  doubling final consonants when adding an ending (e.g., hop to hopping);
(iii)  changing the final “y” to “i” (e.g., baby to babies);
(iv)  using knowledge of common prefixes and suffixes (e.g., dis-, -ly); and
(v)  using knowledge of derivational affixes (e.g., -de, -ful, -able);
(B)  use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:
(i)  closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mag-net, splen-did);
(ii)  open syllable (CV) (e.g., ve-to);
(iii)  final stable syllable (e.g., puz-zle, con-trac-tion);
(iv)  r-controlled vowels (e.g., fer-ment, car-pool); and
(v)  vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., ei-ther);
(C)  decode words applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (e.g., -eigh, -ought);
(D)  identify and read contractions (e.g., I’d, won’t); and
(E)  monitor accuracy in decoding.
(2)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:
(A)  use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues) to make and confirm predictions;
(B)  ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and
(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).
(3)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.
(4)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(A)  identify the meaning of common prefixes (e.g., in-, dis-) and suffixes (e.g., -full, -less), and know how they change the meaning of roots;
(B)  use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs;
(C)  identify and use antonyms, synonyms, homographs, and homophones;
(D)  identify and apply playful uses of language (e.g., tongue twisters, palindromes, riddles); and
(E)  alphabetize a series of words to the third letter and use a dictionary or a glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.
(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; and
(B)  compare and contrast the settings in myths and traditional folktales.
(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e.g., narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, humorous poetry, free verse).
(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the elements of plot and character as presented through dialogue in scripts that are read, viewed, written, or performed.
(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  sequence and summarize the plot’s main events and explain their influence on future events;
(B)  describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and
(C)  identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.
(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference in point of view between a biography and autobiography.
(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses.
(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).
(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author’s purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and locate the author’s stated purposes in writing the text.
(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  identify the details or facts that support the main idea;
(B)  draw conclusions from the facts presented in text and support those assertions with textual evidence;
(C)  identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts; and
(D)  use text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics) to locate information and make and verify predictions about contents of text.
(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to identify what the author is trying to persuade the reader to think or do.
(15)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:
(A)  follow and explain a set of written multi-step directions; and
(B)  locate and use specific information in graphic features of text.
(16)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(A)  understand how communication changes when moving from one genre of media to another;
(B)  explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., shape, color, sound); and
(C)  compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g., language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).
(17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);
(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;
(C)  revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and
(E)  publish written work for a specific audience.
(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
(A)  write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting; and
(B)  write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse).
(19)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write about important personal experiences.
(20)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
(A)  create brief compositions that:
(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence;
(ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and
(iii)  contain a concluding statement;
(B)  write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and
(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate an understanding of the text.
(21)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and use supporting details.
(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i)  verbs (past, present, and future);
(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);
(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive: wooden, rectangular; limiting: this, that; articles: a, an, the);
(iv)  adverbs (e.g., time: before, next; manner: carefully, beautifully);
(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases;
(vi)  possessive pronouns (e.g., his, hers, theirs);
(vii)  coordinating conjunctions (e.g., and, or, but); and
(viii)  time-order transition words and transitions that indicate a conclusion;
(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and
(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
(23)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(A)  write legibly in cursive script with spacing between words in a sentence;
(B)  use capitalization for:
(i)  geographical names and places;
(ii)  historical periods; and
(iii)  official titles of people;
(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i)  apostrophes in contractions and possessives; and
(ii)  commas in series and dates; and
(D)  use correct mechanics including paragraph indentations.
(24)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(A)  use knowledge of letter sounds, word parts, word segmentation, and syllabication to spell;
(B)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(i)  consonant doubling when adding an ending;
(ii)  dropping final “e” when endings are added (e.g., -ing, -ed);
(iii)  changing y to i before adding an ending;
(iv)  double consonants in middle of words;
(v)  complex consonants (e.g., scr-, -dge, -tch); and
(vi)  abstract vowels (e.g., ou as in could, touch, through, bought);
(C)  spell high-frequency and compound words from a commonly used list;
(D)  spell words with common syllable constructions (e.g., closed, open, final stable syllable);
(E)  spell single syllable homophones (e.g., bear/bare; week/weak; road/rode);
(F)  spell complex contractions (e.g., should’ve, won’t); and
(G)  use print and electronic resources to find and check correct spellings.
(25)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:
(A)  generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and
(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.
(26)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:
(A)  follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information, both oral and written, including:
(i)  student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;
(ii)  data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and
(iii)  visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;
(B)  use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics);
(C)  take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;
(D)  identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and
(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.
(27)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic).
(28)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.
(29)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A)  listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments; and
(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a series of related sequences of action.
(30)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to speak coherently about the topic under discussion, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.
(31)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.
 
Reading and Comprehension Skills—Third Grade
Figure: 19 TAC §110.10(b)
Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
(A) establish purposes for reading selected texts based upon own or others’ desired outcome to enhance comprehension;
(B) ask literal, interpretive, and evaluative questions of text;
(C) monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating sensory images, re-reading a portion aloud, generating questions);
(D) make inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding;
(E) summarize information in text, maintaining meaning and logical order; and
(F) make connections (e.g., thematic links, author analysis) between literary and informational texts with similar ideas and provide textual evidence.
 
§111.15. Mathematics, Grade 3.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Grade 3 are multiplying and dividing whole numbers, connecting fraction symbols to fractional quantities, and standardizing language and procedures in geometry and measurement.
(2)  Throughout mathematics in Grades 3-5, students build a foundation of basic understandings in number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry and spatial reasoning; measurement; and probability and statistics. Students use algorithms for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division as generalizations connected to concrete experiences; and they concretely develop basic concepts of fractions and decimals. Students use appropriate language and organizational structures such as tables and charts to represent and communicate relationships, make predictions, and solve problems. Students select and use formal language to describe their reasoning as they identify, compare, and classify two- or three-dimensional geometric figures; and they use numbers, standard units, and measurement tools to describe and compare objects, make estimates, and solve application problems. Students organize data, choose an appropriate method to display the data, and interpret the data to make decisions and predictions and solve problems.
(3)  Throughout mathematics in Grades 3-5, students develop numerical fluency with conceptual understanding and computational accuracy. Students in Grades 3-5 use knowledge of the base-ten
place value system to compose and decompose numbers in order to solve problems requiring precision, estimation, and reasonableness. By the end of Grade 5, students know basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts and are using them to work flexibly, efficiently, and accurately with numbers during addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division computation.
(4)  Problem solving, language and communication, connections within and outside mathematics, and formal and informal reasoning underlie all content areas in mathematics. Throughout mathematics in Grades 3-5, students use these processes together with technology and other mathematical tools such as manipulative materials to develop conceptual understanding and solve meaningful problems as they do mathematics.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(3.1)  Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses place value to communicate about increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written form, including money. The student is expected to:
(A)  use place value to read, write (in symbols and words), and describe the value of whole numbers through 999,999;
(B)  use place value to compare and order whole numbers through 9,999; and
(C)  determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.
(3.2)  Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning.The student uses fraction names and symbols (with denominators of 12 or less) to describe fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects. The student is expected to:
(A)  construct concrete models of fractions;
(B)  compare fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects in a problem situation using concrete models;
(C)  use fraction names and symbols to describe fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects; and
(D)  construct concrete models of equivalent fractions for fractional parts of whole objects.
(3.3)  Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds and subtracts to solve meaningful problems involving whole numbers. The student is expected to:
(A)  model addition and subtraction using pictures, words, and numbers; and
(B)  select addition or subtraction and use the operation to solve problems involving whole numbers through 999.
(3.4)  Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student recognizes and solves problems in multiplication and division situations. The student is expected to:
(A)  learn and apply multiplication facts through 12 by 12 using concrete models and objects;
(B)  solve and record multiplication problems (up to two digits times one digit); and
(C)  use models to solve division problems and use number sentences to record the solutions.
(3.5)  Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student estimates to determine reasonable results. The student is expected to:
(A)  round whole numbers to the nearest ten or hundred to approximate reasonable results in problem situations; and
(B)  use strategies including rounding and compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition and subtraction problems.
(3.6)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses patterns to solve problems. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify and extend whole-number and geometric patterns to make predictions and solve problems;
(B)  identify patterns in multiplication facts using concrete objects, pictorial models, or technology; and
(C)  identify patterns in related multiplication and division sentences (fact families) such as 2 x 3 = 6, 3 x 2 = 6, 6 ÷ 2 = 3, 6 ÷ 3 = 2.
(3.7)  Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses lists, tables, and charts to express patterns and relationships. The student is expected to:
(A)  generate a table of paired numbers based on a real-life situation such as insects and legs; and
(B)  identify and describe patterns in a table of related number pairs based on a meaningful problem and extend the table.
(3.8)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses formal geometric vocabulary.
The student is expected to identify, classify, and describe two- and three-dimensional geometric figures by their attributes. The student compares two- dimensional figures, three-dimensional figures, or both by their attributes using formal geometry vocabulary.
(3.9)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes congruence and symmetry. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify congruent two-dimensional figures;
(B)  create two-dimensional figures with lines of symmetry using concrete models and technology; and
(C)  identify lines of symmetry in two-dimensional geometric figures.
(3.10)  Geometry and spatial reasoning.The student recognizes that a line can be used to represent numbers and fractions and their properties and relationships.
The student is expected to locate and name points on a number line using whole numbers and fractions, including halves and fourths.
(3.11)  Measurement. The student directly compares the attributes of length, area, weight/mass, and capacity, and uses comparative language to solve problems and answer questions. The student selects and uses standard units to describe length, area, capacity/volume, and weight/mass. The student is expected to:
(A)  use linear measurement tools to estimate and measure lengths using standard units;
(B)  use standard units to find the perimeter of a shape;
(C)  use concrete and pictorial models of square units to determine the area of two-dimensional surfaces;
(D)  identify concrete models that approximate standard units of weight/mass and use them to measure weight/mass;
(E)  identify concrete models that approximate standard units for capacity and use them to measure capacity; and
(F)  use concrete models that approximate cubic units to determine the volume of a given container or other three-dimensional geometric figure.
(3.12)  Measurement. The student reads and writes time and measures temperature in degrees Fahrenheit to solve problems. The student is expected to:
(A)  use a thermometer to measure temperature; and
(B)  tell and write time shown on analog and digital clocks.
(3.13)  Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data. The student is expected to:
(A)  collect, organize, record, and display data in pictographs and bar graphs where each picture or cell might represent more than one piece of data;
(B)  interpret information from pictographs and bar graphs; and
(C)  use data to describe events as more likely than, less likely than, or equally likely as.
(3.14)  Underlying processes and mathematical tools.The student applies Grade 3 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school.
The student is expected to:
(A)  identify the mathematics in everyday situations;
(B)  solve problems that incorporate understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;
(C)  select or develop an appropriate problem-solving plan or strategy, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and
(D)  use tools such as real objects, manipulatives, and technology to solve problems.
(3.15)  Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 3 mathematics using informal language. The student is expected to:
(A)  explain and record observations using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology; and
(B)  relate informal language to mathematical language and symbols.
(3.16)  Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning. The student is expected to:
(A)  make generalizations from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples; and
(B)  justify why an answer is reasonable and explain the solution process.
 
§112.14. Science, Grade 3, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  Science, as defined by the National Academy of Sciences, is the “use of evidence to construct testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena, as well as the knowledge generated through this process.”
(2)  Recurring themes are pervasive in sciences, mathematics, and technology. These ideas transcend disciplinary boundaries and include patterns, cycles, systems, models, and change and constancy.
(3)  The study of elementary science includes planning and safely implementing classroom and outdoor investigations using scientific methods, analyzing information, making informed decisions, and using tools to collect and record information while addressing the content and
vocabulary in physical, earth, and life sciences. Districts are encouraged to facilitate classroom and outdoor investigations for at least 60% of instructional time.
(4)  In Grade 3, students learn that the study of science uses appropriate tools and safe practices in planning and implementing investigations, asking and answering questions, collecting data by observing and measuring, and by using models to support scientific inquiry about the natural world.
(A)  Students recognize that patterns, relationships, and cycles exist in matter. Students will investigate the physical properties of matter and will learn that changes occur. They explore mixtures and investigate light, sound, and heat/thermal energy in everyday life. Students manipulate objects by pushing and pulling to demonstrate changes in motion and position.
(B)  Students investigate how the surface of Earth changes and provides resources that humans use. As students explore objects in the sky, they describe how relationships affect patterns and cycles on Earth. Students will construct models to demonstrate Sun, Earth, and Moon system relationships and will describe the Sun’s role in the water cycle.
(C)  Students explore patterns, systems, and cycles within environments by investigating characteristics of organisms, life cycles, and interactions among all components of the natural environment. Students examine how the environment plays a key role in survival. Students know that when changes in the environment occur organisms may thrive, become ill, or perish.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student conducts classroom and outdoor investigations following school and home safety procedures and environmentally appropriate practices. The student is expected to:
(A)  demonstrate safe practices as described in the Texas Safety Standards during classroom and outdoor investigations, including observing a schoolyard habitat; and
(B)  make informed choices in the use and conservation of natural resources by recycling or reusing materials such as paper, aluminum cans, and plastics.
(2)  Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:
(A)  plan and implement descriptive investigations, including asking and answering questions, making inferences, and selecting and using equipment or technology needed, to solve a specific problem in the natural world;
(B)  collect data by observing and measuring using the metric system and recognize differences between observed and measured data;
(C)  construct maps, graphic organizers, simple tables, charts, and bar graphs using tools and current technology to organize, examine, and evaluate measured data;
(D)  analyze and interpret patterns in data to construct reasonable explanations based on evidence from investigations;
(E)  demonstrate that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results; and
(F)  communicate valid conclusions supported by data in writing, by drawing pictures, and through verbal discussion.
(3)  Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows that information, critical thinking, scientific problem solving, and the contributions of scientists are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:
(A)  in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B)  draw inferences and evaluate accuracy of product claims found in advertisements and labels such as for toys and food;
(C)  represent the natural world using models such as volcanoes or Sun, Earth, and Moon system and identify their limitations, including size, properties, and materials; and
(D)  connect grade-level appropriate science concepts with the history of science, science careers, and contributions of scientists.
(4)  Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and methods to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to:
(A)  collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, wind vanes, rain gauges, pan balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, spring scales, hot plates, meter sticks, compasses, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, sound recorders, and Sun, Earth, and Moon system models; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and
(B)  use safety equipment as appropriate, including safety goggles and gloves.
(5)  Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to:
(A)  measure, test, and record physical properties of matter, including temperature, mass, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;
(B)  describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases and demonstrate that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container;
(C)  predict, observe, and record changes in the state of matter caused by heating or cooling; and
(D)  explore and recognize that a mixture is created when two materials are combined such as gravel and sand and metal and plastic paper clips.
(6)  Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that forces cause change and that energy exists in many forms. The student is expected to:
(A)  explore different forms of energy, including mechanical, light, sound, and heat/thermal in everyday life;
(B)  demonstrate and observe how position and motion can be changed by pushing and pulling objects to show work being done such as swings, balls, pulleys, and wagons; and
(C)  observe forces such as magnetism and gravity acting on objects.
(7)  Earth and space. The student knows that Earth consists of natural resources and its surface is constantly changing. The student is expected to:
(A)  explore and record how soils are formed by weathering of rock and the decomposition of plant and animal remains;
(B)  investigate rapid changes in Earth’s surface such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and landslides;
(C)  identify and compare different landforms, including mountains, hills, valleys, and plains; and
(D)  explore the characteristics of natural resources that make them useful in products and materials such as clothing and furniture and how resources may be conserved.
(8)  Earth and space. The student knows there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among objects in the sky. The student is expected to:
(A)  observe, measure, record, and compare day-to-day weather changes in different locations at the same time that include air temperature, wind direction, and precipitation;
(B)  describe and illustrate the Sun as a star composed of gases that provides light and heat energy for the water cycle;
(C)  construct models that demonstrate the relationship of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, including orbits and positions; and
(D)  identify the planets in Earth’s solar system and their position in relation to the Sun.
(9)  Organisms and environments. The student knows that organisms have characteristics that help them survive and can describe patterns, cycles, systems, and relationships within the environments. The student is expected to:
(A)  observe and describe the physical characteristics of environments and how they support populations and communities within an ecosystem;
(B)  identify and describe the flow of energy in a food chain and predict how changes in a food chain affect the ecosystem such as removal of frogs from a pond or bees from a field; and
(C)  describe environmental changes such as floods and droughts where some organisms thrive and others perish or move to new locations.
(10)  Organisms and environments. The student knows that organisms undergo similar life processes and have structures that help them survive within their environments. The student is expected to:
(A)  explore how structures and functions of plants and animals allow them to survive in a particular environment;
(B)  explore that some characteristics of organisms are inherited such as the number of limbs on an animal or flower color and recognize that some behaviors are learned in response to living in a certain environment such as animals using tools to get food; and
(C)  investigate and compare how animals and plants undergo a series of orderly changes in their diverse life cycles such as tomato plants, frogs, and lady bugs.
 
§113.14. Social Studies, Grade 3, Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  In Grade 3, students learn how diverse individuals have changed their communities and world. Students study the effects inspiring heroes have had on communities, past and present. Students learn about the lives of heroic men and women who made important choices, overcame obstacles, sacrificed for the betterment of others, and embarked on journeys that resulted in new ideas, new inventions, new technologies, and new communities. Students expand their knowledge through the identification and study of people who made a difference, influenced public policy and decision making, and participated in resolving issues that are important to all people. Throughout Grade 3, students develop an understanding of the economic, cultural, and scientific contributions made by individuals.
(2)  To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich material such as biographies, founding documents, poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Motivating resources are available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies.
 
(3)  The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be
 
integrated for instructional purposes. Skills listed in the social studies skills strand in subsection
 
(b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills
 
for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained
 
when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are
 
taught together. Statements that contain the word “including” reference content that must be
 
mastered, while those containing the phrase “such as” are intended as possible illustrative
 
examples.
(4)  Students identify the role of the U.S. free enterprise system within the parameters of this course and understand that this system may also be referenced as capitalism or the free market system.
(5)  Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code (TEC), §28.002(h).
(6)  Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure, and are sworn to uphold the constitution.
(7)  State and federal laws mandate a variety of celebrations and observances, including Celebrate Freedom Week.
(A)  Each social studies class shall include, during Celebrate Freedom Week as provided under the TEC, §29.907, or during another full school week as determined by the board of trustees of a school district, appropriate instruction concerning the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, in their historical contexts. The study of the Declaration of Independence must include the study of the relationship of the ideas expressed in that document to subsequent American history, including the relationship of its ideas to the rich diversity of our people as a nation of immigrants, the American Revolution, the formulation of the U.S. Constitution, and the abolitionist movement, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the women’s suffrage movement.
(B)  Each school district shall require that, during Celebrate Freedom Week or other week of instruction prescribed under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, students in Grades 3-12 study and recite the following text: “We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness–That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed.”
(8)  Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities. The student is expected to:
(A)  describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities, past and present;
(B)  identify individuals, including Pierre-Charles L’Enfant, Benjamin Banneker, and Benjamin Franklin, who have helped to shape communities; and
(C)  describe how individuals, including Daniel Boone, Christopher Columbus, the Founding Fathers, and Juan de Oñate, have contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities.
(2)  History. The student understands common characteristics of communities, past and present. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, religious freedom, law, and material well-being;
(B)  identify ways in which people in the local community and other communities meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation; and
(C)  compare ways in which various other communities meet their needs.
(3)  History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:
(A)  use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future times;
(B)  create and interpret timelines; and
(C)  apply the terms year, decade, and century to describe historical times.
(4)  Geography. The student understands how humans adapt to variations in the physical environment. The student is expected to:
(A)  describe and explain variations in the physical environment, including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards;
(B)  identify and compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment in which they live such as deserts, mountains, wetlands, and plains;
(C)  describe the effects of physical processes such as volcanoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes in shaping the landscape;
(D)  describe the effects of human processes such as building new homes, conservation, and pollution in shaping the landscape; and
(E)  identify and compare the human characteristics of various regions.
(5)  Geography. The student understands the concepts of location, distance, and direction on maps and globes. The student is expected to:
(A)  use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes such as the Rocky Mountains, the Mississippi River, and Austin, Texas, in relation to the local community;
(B)  use a scale to determine the distance between places on maps and globes;
(C)  identify and use the compass rose, grid system, and symbols to locate places on maps and globes; and
(D)  create and interpret maps of places and regions that contain map elements, including a title, compass rose, legend, scale, and grid system.
(6)  Economics. The student understands the purposes of earning, spending, saving, and donating money. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify ways of earning, spending, saving, and donating money; and
(B)  create a simple budget that allocates money for spending, saving, and donating.
(7)  Economics. The student understands the concept of the free enterprise system. The student is expected to:
(A)  define and identify examples of scarcity;
(B)  explain the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services; and
(C)  explain the concept of a free market as it relates to the U.S. free enterprise system.
(8)  Economics. The student understands how businesses operate in the U.S. free enterprise system. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify examples of how a simple business operates;
(B)  explain how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service;
(C)  explain how the cost of production and selling price affect profits;
(D)  explain how government regulations and taxes impact consumer costs; and
(E)  identify individuals, past and present, including Henry Ford and other entrepreneurs in the community such as Mary Kay Ash, Wallace Amos, Milton Hershey, and Sam Walton, who have started new businesses.
(9)  Government. The student understands the basic structure and functions of various levels of government. The student is expected to:
(A)  describe the basic structure of government in the local community, state, and nation;
(B)  identify local, state, and national government officials and explain how they are chosen;
(C)  identify services commonly provided by local, state, and national governments; and
(D)  explain how local, state, and national government services are financed.
(10)  Government. The student understands important ideas in historical documents at various levels of government. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify the purposes of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights; and
(B)  describe and explain the importance of the concept of “consent of the governed” as it relates to the functions of local, state, and national government.
(11)  Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historical and contemporary figures. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word, and voting;
(B)  identify historical figures such as Helen Keller and Clara Barton and contemporary figures such as Ruby Bridges and military and first responders who exemplify good citizenship; and
(C)  identify and explain the importance of individual acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws, serving the community, serving on a jury, and voting.
(12)  Citizenship. The student understands the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a constitutional republic. The student is expected to:
(A)  give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions;
(B)  identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community; and
(C)  identify examples of nonprofit and/or civic organizations such as the Red Cross and explain how they serve the common good.
(13)  Culture. The student understands ethnic and/or cultural celebrations of the local community and other communities. The student is expected to:
(A)  explain the significance of various ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in the local community and other communities; and
(B)  compare ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in the local community with other communities.
(14)  Culture. The student understands the role of heroes in shaping the culture of communities, the state, and the nation. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify and compare the heroic deeds of state and national heroes, including Hector P. Garcia and James A. Lovell, and other individuals such as Harriet Tubman, Juliette Gordon Low, Todd Beamer, Ellen Ochoa, John “Danny” Olivas, and other contemporary heroes; and
(B)  identify and analyze the heroic deeds of individuals, including military and first responders such as the Four Chaplains.
(15)  Culture. The student understands the importance of writers and artists to the cultural heritage of communities. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify various individual writers and artists such as Kadir Nelson, Tomie dePaola, and Phillis Wheatley and their stories, poems, statues, and paintings and other examples of cultural heritage from various communities; and
(B)  explain the significance of various individual writers and artists such as Carmen Lomas Garza, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and Bill Martin Jr. and their stories, poems, statues, and paintings and other examples of cultural heritage to various communities.
(16)  Science, technology, and society. The student understands how individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in various communities, past and present. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify scientists and inventors, including Jonas Salk, Maria Mitchell, and others who have discovered scientific breakthroughs or created or invented new technology such as Cyrus McCormick, Bill Gates, and Louis Pasteur; and
(B)  identify the impact of scientific breakthroughs and new technology in computers, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on various communities.
(17)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
(A)  research information, including historical and current events, and geographic data, about the community and world, using a variety of valid print, oral, visual, and Internet resources;
(B)  sequence and categorize information;
(C)  interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, distinguishing between fact and opinion, identifying cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting;
(D)  use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index as well as keyword Internet searches, to locate information;
(E)  interpret and create visuals, including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps; and
(F)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.
(18)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A)  express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences;
(B)  use technology to create written and visual material such as stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas; and
(C)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.
(19)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:
(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.
 
§114.2. Languages Other Than English, Elementary.
School districts are strongly encouraged to offer languages other than English in the elementary grades. For districts that offer languages in elementary, the essential knowledge and skills are those designated as Levels I and II – novice progress checkpoint, exploratory languages, and cultural and linguistic topics in Subchapter C of this chapter (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Languages Other Than English).
 
§115.5. Health Education, Grade 3.
(a)  Introduction.
 
(1)  In health education, students acquire the health information and skills necessary to become
 
healthy adults and learn about behaviors in which they should and should not participate. To
 
achieve that goal, students will understand the following: students should first seek guidance in
 
the area of health from their parents; personal behaviors can increase or reduce health risks
 
throughout the lifespan; health is influenced by a variety of factors; students can recognize and
 
utilize health information and products; and personal/interpersonal skills are needed to promote
 
individual, family, and community health.
(2)  In Grade 3, students build on the knowledge and skills learned in the second grade. In addition to students learning health knowledge that can help them improve or maintain health habits, students begin to learn about body systems, growth and development, and the relationship between health and the environment. Students are also introduced to interpersonal skills that they will use to communicate and interact with friends and family.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Health behaviors. The student explains ways to enhance and maintain health throughout the life span. The student is expected to:
(A)  explain how personal-health habits affect self and others;
(B)  describe ways to improve personal fitness;
(C)  identify types of nutrients;
(D)  describe food combinations in a balanced diet such as a food pyramid;
(E)  explain the effects of too much stress and practice ways to reduce stress such as exercising and listening to music; and
(F)  explain strategies for maintaining a personal-health plan such as a commitment to good personal hygiene and checkups and an awareness of safety skills.
(2)  Health behaviors. The student recognizes and performs behaviors that reduce health risks throughout the life span. The student is expected to:
(A)  explain the need for obeying safety rules at home, school, work, and play such as bike safety and avoidance of weapons;
(B)  describe the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs on physical, mental, and social health and why people should not use them;
(C)  identify reasons for avoiding violence, gangs, weapons and drugs;
(D)  identify examples of abuse and describe appropriate responses; and
(E)  describe the importance of taking personal responsibility for reducing hazards, avoiding accidents, and preventing accidental injuries.
(3)  Health behaviors. The student knows and engages in behaviors that prevent disease and speed recovery from illness. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify health behaviors that prevent the spread of disease and avoid behaviors that cause the transmission of disease;
(B)  explain the body’s defense systems and how they fight disease; and
(C)  explain actions to take when illness occurs such as informing parents/adults.
(4)  Health information. The student names the basic structures and functions of the human body and explains how they relate to personal health throughout the life span. The student is expected to:
(A)  list and explain the stages of growth and development;
(B)  name and locate major components of the body systems; and
(C)  explain the interrelationships of the body systems.
(5)  Health information. The student knows how to access health information. The student is expected to:
(A)  demonstrate the ability to locate resources from parents and family members, school, and the community; and
(B)  demonstrate the ability to locate school and community health helpers.
(6)  Influencing factors. The student understands factors that influence individual and community health. The student is expected to:
(A)  relate how protecting the environment promotes individual and community health;
(B)  identify common health problems that result from unhealthy environments such as skin cancer, poisoning, and respiratory illness;
(C)  identify ways to protect personal health from environmental hazards such as lead removal and no-smoking laws; and
(D)  describe roles and responsibilities of family members in promoting and practicing health behaviors.
(7)  Influencing factors. The student comprehends ways in which media and technology influence individual and community health. The student is expected to:
(A)  describe how the media can influence knowledge and health behaviors; and
(B)  identify ways in which health care has improved as a result of technology.
(8)  Personal/interpersonal skills. The student understands how relationships can positively and negatively influence individual and community health. The student is expected to:
(A)  distinguish between positive and negative peer pressures and their effects on personal health behaviors; and
(B)  describe ways in which peers and families can work together to build a healthy community.
(9)  Personal/interpersonal skills. The student uses social skills in building and maintaining healthy relationships. The student is expected to:
(A)  demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communication;
(B)  demonstrate strategies for resolving conflicts;
(C)  explain how to be a good friend;
(D)  demonstrate effective listening skills;
(E)  identify ways to communicate with parents/trusted adults about health concerns; and
(F)  demonstrate refusal skills.
(10)  Personal/interpersonal skills. The student explains healthy ways to communicate consideration and respect for self, family, friends, and others. The student is expected to:
(A)  demonstrate respectful communication with family members, peers, teachers, and others;
(B)  describe the mental-health value of respectful communication such as reducing the potential for angry behavior; and
(C)  express needs, wants, and emotions in healthy ways.
(11)  Personal/interpersonal skills. The student recognizes critical-thinking, decision-making, goal-setting, and problem-solving skills for making health-promoting decisions. The student is expected to:
(A)  practice critical-thinking skills when making health decisions;
(B)  gather data to help make informed health choices;
(C)  explain the positive and negative consequences of making a health-related choice;
(D)  explain the importance of seeking assistance in making decisions about health;
(E)  practice assertive communication and refusal skills;
(F)  describe goal-setting skills; and
(G)  explain the importance of time passage with respect to a goal.
 
§116.5. Physical Education, Grade 3.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  In Physical Education, students acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity, and access to a physically-active lifestyle. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle and understands the relationship between physical activity and health throughout the lifespan.
(2)  In Grades 3-5, students continue to develop strength, endurance, and flexibility. Students can demonstrate mature form in fundamental locomotor and manipulative skills and can often maintain that form while participating in dynamic game situations. Identifying personal fitness goals for themselves and beginning to understand how exercise affects different parts of the body is an important part of the instructional process.
(3)  In Grade 3, students begin to learn and demonstrate more mature movement forms. Students also learn age-specific skills and the health benefits of physical activity. Students begin to learn game strategies, rules, and etiquette.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Movement. The student demonstrates competency in fundamental movement patterns and proficiency in a few specialized movement forms. The student is expected to:
(A)  travel in forward, sideways, and backwards and change direction quickly and safely in dynamic situations;
(B)  demonstrate proper form and smooth transitions during combinations of fundamental locomotor and body control skills such as running and jumping safely in dynamic situations;
(C)  demonstrate mature form in jogging, running, and leaping;
(D)  demonstrate moving in and out of a balanced position with control;
(E)  demonstrate proper body alignment in lifting, carrying, pushing, and pulling;
(F)  demonstrate control and appropriate form such as curled position and protection of neck in rolling activities such as forward roll, shoulder roll, and safety rolls;
(G)  transfer on and off equipment with good body control such as boxes, benches, stacked mats, horizontal bar, and balance beam;
(H)  clap echoes in a variety of one measure rhythmical patterns;
(I)  demonstrate various step patterns and combinations of movement in repeatable sequences; and
(J)  demonstrate key elements in manipulative skills such as underhand throw, overhand throw, catch and kick such as position your side to the target.
(2)  Movement. The student applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify similar positions in a variety of movements such as straddle positions, ready position, and bending knees to absorb force; and
(B)  know that practice, attention and effort are required to improve skills.
(3)  Physical activity and health. The student exhibits a health enhancing, physically-active lifestyle that provides opportunities for enjoyment and challenge. The student is expected to:
(A)  describe and select physical activities that provide for enjoyment and challenge;
(B)  participate in moderate to vigorous physical activities on a daily basis that cause increased heart rate, breathing rate, and perspiration;
(C)  participate in appropriate exercises for developing flexibility;
(D)  lift and support his/her own weight in selected activities that develop muscular strength and endurance of the arms, shoulders, abdomen, back, and legs such as hanging, hopping, and jumping; and
(E)  identify opportunities for participation in physical activity in the community such as little league and parks and recreation.
(4)  Physical activity and health. The student knows the benefits from involvement in daily physical activity and factors that affect physical performance. The student is expected to:
(A)  describe the long term effects of physical activity on the heart;
(B)  distinguish between aerobic and anaerobic activities;
(C)  identify foods that increase or reduce bodily functions; and
(D)  identify principles of good posture and its impact on physical activity.
(5)  Physical activity and health. The student understands and applies safety practices associated with physical activities. The student is expected to:
(A)  use equipment safely and properly;
(B)  select and use proper attire that promotes participation and prevents injury;
(C)  identify and apply safety precautions when walking, jogging, and skating in the community such as use sidewalks, walk on the left side of street when facing traffic, wear lights/reflective clothing, and be considerate of other pedestrians; and
(D)  identify exercise precautions such as awareness of temperature and weather conditions and need for warm-up and cool-down activities.
(6)  Social development. The student understands basic components such as strategies and rules of structured physical activities including but not limited to, games, sports, dance, and gymnastics. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify components of games that can be modified to make the games and participants more successful; and
(B)  explain the importance of basic rules in games and activities.
(7)  Social development. The student develops positive self-management and social skills needed to work independently and with others in physical activity settings. The student is expected to:
(A)  follow rules, procedures, and etiquette;
(B)  persevere when not successful on the first try in learning movement skills; and
(C)  accept and respect differences and similarities in physical abilities of self and others.
 
§117.11. Art, Grade 3.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  Four basic strands–perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation–provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Students rely on their perceptions of the environment, developed through increasing visual awareness and sensitivity to surroundings, memory, imagination, and life experiences, as a source for creating artworks. They express their thoughts and ideas creatively, while challenging their imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and problem-solving skills.
(2)  By analyzing artistic styles and historical periods students develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students respond to and analyze artworks, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify sensory knowledge and life experiences as sources for ideas about visual symbols, self, and life events; and
(B)  identify art elements such as color, texture, form, line, space, and value and art principles such as emphasis, pattern, rhythm, balance, proportion, and unity in artworks.
(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:
(A)  create artworks based on personal observations and experiences;
(B)  develop a variety of effective compositions, using design skills; and
(C)  produce drawings, paintings, prints, constructions, ceramics, and fiberart, using a variety of art materials appropriately.
(3)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture as records of human achievement. The student is expected to:
(A)  compare content in artworks from the past and present for various purposes such as telling stories and documenting history and traditions;
(B)  compare selected artworks from different cultures; and
(C)  relate art to different kinds of jobs in everyday life.
(4)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about personal artworks and the artworks of others. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify general intent and expressive qualities in personal artworks; and
(B)  apply simple criteria to identify main ideas in original artworks, portfolios, and exhibitions by peers and major artists.
 
§117.12. Music, Grade 3.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  Four basic strands–perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation–provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. In music, students develop their intellect and refine their emotions, understanding the cultural and creative nature of musical artistry and making connections among music, the other arts, technology, and other aspects of social life. Through creative performance, students apply the expressive technical skills of music and critical-thinking skills to evaluate multiple forms of problem solving.
(2)  By reflecting on musical periods and styles, students understand music’s role in history and are able to participate successfully in a diverse society. Students analyze and evaluate music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Perception. The student describes and analyzes musical sound and demonstrates musical artistry. The student is expected to:
(A)  categorize a variety of musical sounds, including children’s and adults’ voices; woodwind, brass, string, percussion, keyboard, and electronic instruments; and instruments from various cultures;
(B)  use music terminology in explaining sound, music, music notation, musical instruments and voices, and musical performances; and
(C)  identify music forms presented aurally such as AB, ABA, and rondo.
(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student performs a varied repertoire of music. The student is expected to:
(A)  sing or play a classroom instrument independently or in groups; and
(B)  sing songs from diverse cultures and styles or play such songs on a musical instrument.
(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student reads and writes music notation. The student is expected to:
(A)  read music notation, using a system (letters, numbers, syllables);
(B)  write music notation, using a system (letters, numbers, syllables);
(C)  read and write music that incorporates basic rhythmic patterns in simple meters; and
(D)  identify music symbols and terms referring to dynamics and tempo.
(4)  Creative expression/performance. The student creates and arranges music within specified guidelines. The student is expected to:
(A)  create rhythmic phrases; and
(B)  create melodic phrases.
(5)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates music to history, to society, and to culture. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify aurally-presented excerpts of music representing diverse genres, styles, periods, and cultures;
(B)  perform songs and musical games from diverse cultures; and
(C)  describe relationships between music and other subjects.
(6)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates music and musical performance. The student is expected to:
(A)  define basic criteria for evaluating musical performances; and
(B)  exhibit audience etiquette during live performances.
 
§117.13. Theatre, Grade 3.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  Four basic strands–perception, creative expression/ performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation–provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through perceptual studies, students increase their understanding of self and others and develop clear ideas about the world. Through a variety of theatrical experiences, students communicate in a dramatic form, make artistic choices, solve problems, build positive self-concepts, and relate interpersonally.
(2)  Students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions through historical and cultural studies in theatre. Student response and evaluation promote thinking and further discriminating judgment, developing students who are appreciative and evaluative consumers of live theatre, film, television, and other technologies.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Perception. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment, using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:
(A)  react to sensory and emotional experiences;
(B)  create playing space, using expressive and rhythmic movement;
(C)  respond to sound, music, images, and the written word with voice and movement and participate in dramatic play, using actions, sounds, and dialogue; and
(D)  reflect the environment, portray character, and demonstrate actions in classroom dramatizations.
(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student interprets characters, using the voice and body expressively, and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:
(A)  demonstrate safe use of movement and voice;
(B)  participate in a variety of roles in real life and imaginative situations through narrative pantomime, dramatic play, and story dramatization;
(C)  dramatize literary selections, using shadow play and puppetry; and
(D)  dramatize literary selections, using pantomime and imitative dialogue.
(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:
(A)  identify technical theatre elements;
(B)  begin to use simple technical theatre elements;
(C)  plan dramatic play; and
(D)  cooperate and interact with others in dramatic play.
(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:
(A)  illustrate similarities and differences in life and theatre through dramatic play; and
(B)  reflect historical and diverse cultural influences in dramatic activities.
(5)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:
(A)  evaluate and apply appropriate audience behavior consistently;
(B)  evaluate simple dramatic activities and performances;
(C)  incorporate music, movement, and visual components in dramatic play; and
(D)  observe the performance of amateur and professional artists and begin to compare vocations in theatre.
 
§126.3. Technology Applications, Grades 3-5.
(a)  Introduction.
(1)  The technology applications curriculum has four strands: foundations, information acquisition, work in solving problems, and communication.
 
(2)  Through the study of technology applications foundations, including technology-related
 
terms, concepts, and data input strategies, students learn to make informed decisions about
 
technologies and their applications. The efficient acquisition of information includes the
 
identification of task requirements; the plan for using search strategies; and the use of technology
 
to access, analyze, and evaluate the acquired information. By using technology as a tool that
 
supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the
 
technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create a solution, and evaluate the
 
results. Students communicate information in different formats and to diverse audiences. A
 
variety of technologies will be used. Students will analyze and evaluate the results.
(b)  Knowledge and skills.
(1)  Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:
(A)  use technology terminology appropriate to the task;
(B)  save and delete files, uses menu options and commands, and work with more than one software application;
(C)  identify and describe the characteristics of digital input, processing, and output;
(D)  delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited to, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity; and
(E)  access remote equipment on a network such as a printer or other peripherals.
(2)  Foundations. The student uses data input skills appropriate to the task. The student is expected to:
(A)  use a variety of input devices such as mouse, keyboard, disk drive, modem, voice/sound recorder, scanner, digital video, CD-ROM, or touch screen;
(B)  use proper keyboarding techniques such as correct hand and body positions and smooth and rhythmic keystroke patterns;
(C)  demonstrate touch keyboarding techniques for operating the alphabetic, numeric, punctuation, and symbol keys as grade-level appropriate;
(D)  produce documents at the keyboard, proofread, and correct errors;
(E)  use language skills including capitalization, punctuation, spelling, word division, and use of numbers and symbols as grade-level appropriate; and
(F)  demonstrate an appropriate speed on short timed exercises depending upon the grade level and hours of instruction.
(3)  Foundations. The student complies with the laws and examines the issues regarding the use of technology in society. The student is expected to:
(A)  follow acceptable use policies when using computers; and
(B)  model respect of intellectual property by not illegally copying software or another individual’s electronic work.
(4)  Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:
(A)  apply appropriate electronic search strategies in the acquisition of information including keyword and Boolean search strategies; and
(B)  select appropriate strategies to navigate and access information on local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), including the Internet and intranet, for research and resource sharing.
(5)  Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:
(A)  acquire information including text, audio, video, and graphics; and
(B)  use on-line help and documentation.
(6)  Information acquisition. The student evaluates the acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:
(A)  apply critical analysis to resolve information conflicts and validate information;
(B)  determine the success of strategies used to acquire electronic information; and
(C)  determine the usefulness and appropriateness of digital information.
(7)  Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:
(A)  use software programs with audio, video, and graphics to enhance learning experiences;
(B)  use appropriate software to express ideas and solve problems including the use of word processing, graphics, databases, spreadsheets, simulations, and multimedia; and
(C)  use a variety of data types including text, graphics, digital audio, and video.
(8)  Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new knowledge. The student is expected to:
(A)  use communication tools to participate in group projects;
(B)  use interactive technology environments, such as simulations, electronic science or mathematics laboratories, virtual museum field trips, or on-line interactive lessons, to manipulate information; and
(C)  participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, or mentor.
(9)  Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:
(A)  use software features, such as on-line help, to evaluate work progress; and
(B)  use software features, such as slide show previews, to evaluate final product.
(10)  Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is expected to:
(A)  use font attributes, color, white space, and graphics to ensure that products are appropriate for the defined audience;
(B)  use font attributes, color, white space, and graphics to ensure that products are appropriate for the communication media including multimedia screen displays, Internet documents, and printed materials; and
(C)  use appropriate applications including, but not limited to, spreadsheets and databases to develop charts and graphs by using data from various sources.
(11)  Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:
(A)  publish information in a variety of media including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; and
(B)  use presentation software to communicate with specific audiences.
(12)  Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:
(A)  select representative products to be collected and stored in an electronic evaluation tool;
(B)  evaluate the product for relevance to the assignment or task; and
(C)  create technology assessment tools to monitor progress of project such as checklists, timelines, or rubrics.

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